24.11.16 Exhibition Histories Talks: David Toop

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We are pleased to announce the twelfth in our series of talks analysing and contextualising exhibitions through the personal accounts of the curators responsible, co-organised with Whitechapel Gallery, London.

On 24 November 2016 musician, author and curator David Toop will discuss ‘Sonic Boom: The Art of Sound’, which took place at the Hayward Gallery, London in 2000. Drawing together practitioners across improvised music, performance, sound design and the visual arts, Sonic Boom’s presentation of ‘sound combined with visual art’ has been identified as the first major UK exhibition of sound art.

Exhibition Histories Talks: David Toop
Thursday 24 November 2016, 19:00–20:30

Whitechapel Gallery
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London
E1 7QX

Tickets: £9.50 (Concessions £7.50). To purchase tickets visit the Whitechapel Gallery website.

This event is a collaboration with Whitechapel Gallery, London and part of the Exhibition Histories research and publication project, developed by Afterall and published in association with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

The Exhibition Histories series is distributed by Koenig Books, London.

Image: Christina Kubisch, Oasis (2000): Music for a Concrete Jungle (installation view). ‘Sonic Boom: The Art of Sound’, Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London 2000. Image © Nicola Levinsky

5.11.16 Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia

Join us for this three-day symposium to reflect on critical events for transnational contemporary art across Southeast Asia in the 1990s. Informed by recent archival research undertaken into Chiang Mai Social Installation (CMSI), an artist-initiated festival held in northern Thailand (see Simon Soon’s essay in the upcoming issue of Afterall), we propose three key questions for discussion:

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Image: Installation at Tha Pae Gate, Chiang Mai as part of the second Week of Cooperative Suffering, Chiang Mai Social Installation, 1997. Artist(s) and title unknown. Courtesy Uthit Atimana and Gridthiya Gaweewong.

 

  • How did CMSI, and gatherings like it, inform and displace the more deliberate, institutional pictures of a region propagated elsewhere, for example by large triennials in Brisbane and Fukuoka?
  • If Southeast Asia was still peripheral to the art world’s centres in the 1990s, its artists decisively joined that world during that decade, experimenting with art forms — performance, site-specific installation, participatory and so-called relational practices — that had special currency in the burgeoning global art circuit. But what was their currency within the region itself?
  • Enquiries framed as ‘exhibition histories’ may be able to do better justice to the specific local conditions of art’s presentation and reception, but were exhibitions the critical junctures that precipitated post-national contemporary art, or were they the means to other ends?

This symposium will examine the forms and contexts of artistic and curatorial practice, the modes of organisation, and the importance of artist-to-artist relationships across an emergent Southeast Asian art world in the 1990s.

Regions of the Contemporary:
Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia
Saturday 5–Monday 7 November 2016
Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room
Level One
Sidney Myer Asia Centre
University of Melbourne
Victoria 3010
Australia

This symposium is free and open to all.

Confirmed panel speakers and contributors include: Uthit Atimana, John Clark, Pamela Corey, Patrick Flores, Anthony Gardner, Gridthiya Gaweewong, Ray Langenbach, Roger Nelson, Claire M Roberts, Grace Samboh, Thasnai Setheseree, Simon Soon, Russell Storer and Chương-Đài Võ – with convenors David Teh, Lucy Steeds, Charles Green and Charles Esche. On Monday afternoon, the Keir Foundation Lecture will be delivered by Apinan Poshyananda.

A detailed programme will follow shortly.

To register your interest in this event, and for further information once it becomes available, please email Louis Hartnoll: l.hartnoll@afterall.org.

This symposium is co-organised by Afterall and the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne. It will test ideas for forthcoming books in the Afterall’s Exhibition Histories series, produced in collaboration with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

20.10.16 Exhibition Histories Talks: Art and Technology – Catherine Wood

Afterall and Arts Catalyst are pleased to announce two talks developed as part of Afterall’sExhibition Histories series and presented within Arts Catalyst’s current season ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited, 1966/2016’. Using the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the renowned 1966 events and the founding of Experiments in Art and Technology, the talks will reflect on the histories of art and technology in performance, on transdisciplinary collaboration and the influence of the 1960s on contemporary art today.

Catherine Wood, Senior Curator, International Art (Performance) at Tate, will host an evening of screenings, showing films of Robert Rauschenberg’s Open Score and Yvonne Rainer’s Carriage Discreteness, both works produced as part of ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering in 1966’. The screenings will be followed by an informal talk from Wood reading both pieces as well as the broader practice of Rauschenberg and Rainer within the context of dance.

This event builds on Wood’s ongoing interest and in-depth knowledge on both artists practice, having curated the critically acclaimed retrospective ‘Yvonne Rainer: Dance Works’ at Raven Row in 2014 and as co-curator of the forthcoming ‘Robert Rachenberg Retrospective’ at Tate Modern, opening in December 2016.

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Yvonne Rainer, Carriage Discreteness, ‘9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering’, October 1966. View of the performance, with Steve Paxton on the swing to the right. Photo ©Adelaide de Menil

Exhibition Histories – Art and Technology Talk: Catherine Wood
Thursday 20th October, 18:30–20:30

Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology
74-76 Cromer Street
London
WC1H 8DR

This event has now sold out. Final tickets remaining for Jeremy Millar on Thursday 13 October are available on Eventbrite.

This event is a collaboration between Afterall and Arts Catalyst. It is part of the Exhibition Histories research and publication project, developed by Afterall and published in association with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

The ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited 1966/2016’ programme is supported by Arts Council England, Cockayne – Grants for the Arts, The London Community Foundation, PACE, Afterall, Central Saint Martins, UAL, King’s Cross and Goldsmiths, University of London, University of Westminster, London: The Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM) with the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture (IMCC) and The Performance Studio.

The Exhibition Histories series is distributed by Koenig Books, London.
Catherine Wood’s Yvonne Rainer: The Mind is a Muscle was published by Afterall in 2007.

13.10.16 Exhibition Histories Talks: Art and Technology – Jeremy Millar

Afterall and Arts Catalyst are pleased to announce two talks developed as part of Afterall’s Exhibition Histories series and presented within Arts Catalyst’s current season ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited, 1966/2016’. Using the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the renowned 1966 events and the founding of Experiments in Art and Technology, the talks will reflect on the histories of art and technology in performance, on transdisciplinary collaboration and the influence of the 1960s on contemporary art today.

Artist Jeremy Millar will host an evening screening of the film documenting John Cage’s performance Variations VII., produced as part of ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering’. Millar will then contextualise the piece in relation to Cage’s broader practice and related works.

Exhibition Histories – Art and Technology Talk: Jeremy Millar
Thursday 13th October, 18:30-20:30

Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology
74-76 Cromer Street
London
WC1H 8DR

Tickets are £3. Capacity is limited and booking is essential. Final tickets are available from the Eventbrite page.

This event is a collaboration between Afterall and Arts Catalyst. It is part of the Exhibition Histories research and publication project, developed by Afterall and published in association with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

The ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited 1966/2016’ programme is supported by Arts Council England, Cockayne – Grants for the Arts, The London Community Foundation, PACE, Afterall, Central Saint Martins, UAL, King’s Cross and Goldsmiths, University of London, University of Westminster, London: The Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM) with the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture (IMCC) and The Performance Studio.

The Exhibition Histories series is distributed by Koenig Books, London.

Screen Shot 2016-09-29 at 21.19.50John Cage, Variations VII., ‘9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering’, October 1966. View of the performance from the floor of the Armory, with audience standing and the performance area in the background. Photo © Adelaide de Menil.

10.10.16 “Cultural Anthropophagy” and “Biennials, Triennials, and Documenta”, Joint Book Launch and Discussion

Biennials, Triennials, and Documenta and Cultural Anthropophagy joint launch with Anthony Gardner and Pablo Lafuente

Join us for the joint launch of Biennials, Triennials, and documenta: The Exhibitions that Created Contemporary Art, by Anthony Gardner and Charles Green, and Cultural Anthropophagy: The 24th Bienal de São Paulo 1998, co-edited by Lisette Lagnado and Pablo Lafuente at The Showroom, London.

Screen Shot 2016-09-29 at 20.24.43Gardner and Lafuente will be joined by Yaiza Hernández to consider the increasing emergence of large-scale, international exhibitions against the context of neoliberal globalisation. The case studies included amongst this trajectory – such as the second Bienal de Habana (1986), the Whitney Biennial (1993) and Documenta 11 (2002) – and an analysis of the growing roles of sponsors, philanthropists and biennial directors, help illustrate the burgeoning global, political and cultural concerns that accompany art today. Placing the 24th Bienal de São Paulo (1998) within such a history, including its emphases on ‘contamination’ and ‘cannibalisation’, will provide the opportunity to test how its particular approach complicates or complements art’s shifting conditions of production, curation and display.

Biennials, Triennials, and Documenta and Cultural Anthropophagy joint launch with Anthony Gardner and Pablo Lafuente

Monday 10 October, 19:00–20:30
The Showroom
63 Penfold Street
London
NW8 8PQ

This event is free and no booking is required in advance.

This event is organised by Afterall in collaboration with The Showroom. Biennials, Triennials, and documenta: The Exhibitions that Created Contemporary Art is published by Wiley Blackwell, 2016. Cultural Anthropophagy: The 24th Bienal de São Paulo 1998 is published by Afterall Books in association with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, 2015.

More info here: http://www.theshowroom.org/events/biennials-triennials-and-documenta-and-cultural-anthropophagy-joint-launch-with-anthony-gardner-and-pablo-lafuente